• March 3Graduation on 24 May 2018

Filed under Opinion, Staff

See Red, Stop

photo+via+pixabay+under+creative+commons+licenses
photo via pixabay under creative commons licenses

photo via pixabay under creative commons licenses

photo via pixabay under creative commons licenses

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When a light turns red, you stop. It’s simple and easy to do once you begin to drive, the same should be applied when you’re writing.

 

Everyone sees the red line on the front of the paper, but how about the faint one that seeps through the paper from the back? And if people do stop, then what does it say about their character?

 

Stopping at the red line on the back of the paper means when you’re writing on a lined piece of paper, you don’t go over the faded line on the back of the paper. Some people might do it and not realize it, but some people intentionally go from the red line on the front to the soft one that you can see from the back.

 

People who stop at the red line, do it because if “a ton of words are crammed on [that] one side it looks sloppy”, Ivy Lile, a freshman from Higley, explained her reasoning for stopping at the red line.

 

So, it seems obvious if we believe that people who stop at the red line tend to be more organized, right? Possibly, but it’s not always true. Ivy also said “I try to be as organized or neat as possible, but I stop at the line and I’m not completely organized”.

 

So, then what does it do? Do students and people who stop at the red line actually have something in common? Maybe they tend to be more rule abiding? Also, not always true, but most of the time it is.

 

Perhaps it’s based off when they first started not crossing the line, if they do it all the time or if they’re wishy-washy like me. I first stopped crossing the line when I was in middle school and if we crossed the line, we’d get points marked off.

 

But if people were to go through this training, does that mean that they could possibly be more organized? I hate this to be all speculation, but I do think so. If we’re trained at a young enough age to look for things that are more “uniform” and “neat” then maybe we’d actually have those qualities ourselves.

 

It has been proven that if we learn at a young age and continue to pursue what we want passionately, then we’ll be able to learn it faster and pick it up easier.

 

Even though we aren’t at an age where we can pick things up faster, I think that stopping when you see the red line on the end of the paper is a good way to start getting yourself organized.

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